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Levtence

Levtent is an adjective that describes a fauceir that is reluctant to evolve and rather evades all control mechanisms that would force it to improve adaption. Levtent fauceirs are rather inclined to adapt or even cheat and by that token are liable to evolve into parasites.

Etymology

Levtent is an artificial word. I invented it in my youth to characterize people who I felt were not curious enough, fellows that preferred an easy life to more challenging adventures. The term was originally devtired, made from developmentally tiered (which is a typicall German construction translated into English. That time, I did understand yet neither the difference between the English terms development and evolution, ontogeny and phylogeny, nor the meaning of tiredness, reluctance, and laziness). Anyway devtired was difficult to pronounce in German context as it contains unusual vovels, so I changed it to levtent. At least in German pronounciation it sounds somehow alike.

Synonyms

Now more familiar with languages I certainly know that there exist several terms in several languages that can be used in different context. From Merriam-Webster's thesaurus, I extracted these words:

"

apathy, casualness, complacence, disinterestedness, disregard, incuriosity, incuriousness, insouciance, nonchalance, torpor, unconcern, halfheartedness, lukewarmness, tepidity, tepidness; carelessness, heedlessness, recklessness, unawareness; lethargy, listlessness; aloofness, coldness, cool, detachment, dispassion; callosity, callousness, hard-heartedness, hardness, insensitivity; bloodlessness, impassiveness, impassivity, phlegm, stoicism, stolidity

"

That are mostly related to human behavior.

Antonym

Levtence is not a property limited to human fauceirs, I propose using levtent as an abstract technical term applicable to all fauceirs. As an antonym, questy (questly adverb, questness noun) may serve, which I derived from Charles Pasternak's book that describes human quest as an inborn drive to conquer new territories in land, science, knowledge, resources, and nearly all fauceirs that can be mastered [1].


Tags: Behavior Cognitive function Evolution Linguistic


Categories: Philosophy

 
   

(c) Mato Nagel, Weißwasser 2004-2013, Disclaimer